Urology Needs by Age

Age 20 - 40 years

20-40 year olds urology needs

Vasectomy

Milwaukee Urology Associates MilwaukeeVasectomy is the most common form of permanent male birth control. It is a minor, office based procedure, which removes a portion and closes off the vas deferens (the tubes that carry sperm from the testes). It takes about 15 minutes and has no effect on male sexual function. Vasectomies can be performed in the office or in an out patient center.

Because the procedure is minimally invasive, many vasectomy patients find that they can resume their typical lifestyle routines within a week, and do so with minimal discomfort.

Vasectomy Reversal

Vasectomy reversal is a term used for surgical procedures that reconnect the male reproductive tract after interruption by a vasectomy. Although vasectomy is considered a permanent form of contraception, advances in microsurgery have improved the success of vasectomy reversal procedures.

Vasectomy reversal is performed as an outpatient surgical procedure using an operative microscope and extremely small sutures.

The procedure usually takes about 3-4 hours. During the procedure, fluid from the vas deferens is examined under the microscope to confirm that no additional blockages are present. This procedure requires additional operative time and microsurgical skill, but success rates still remain around 70% when the vas is connected to the epididymis.

Kidney Stones

Kidney stones (urinary calculi) are stones formed from concentrated levels of minerals typically found in the urine such as calcium and uric acid.  If these minerals concentrate to high enough levels they will crystallize and accumulate into larger stone-like structures known as urinary calculi. They can form anywhere in the urinary tract from the kidneys down to the ureters and bladder.

Patients with stones will often have sudden onset severe flank pain radiating to the groin, nausea, vomiting and tenderness on the flank. A CT scan or X-ray can be done to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment for small stones can include pain medication and increasing fluid intake. If a stone is too large to pass, treatments such as laser therapy, shockwave lithotripsy and ureteroscopy can be performed.

Adult Circumcision

Adult circumcision is completed for multiple reasons; it is best to do it for medical reasons rather than pure cosmetic reasons in the adult. The medical reasons are usually chronic irritation, infection, phimosis (foreskin cannot retract), penile cancer, penile lesions, condyloma (venereal warts), and some other less common conditions. These are done in an outpatient setting. Return to work is not immediate, usually after the pain has resolved in one week.

Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (impotence) is the inability to get and keep an erection firm enough for sex. Having erection trouble from time to time isn’t necessarily a cause for concern. But if erectile dysfunction is an ongoing problem, it may cause stress, relationship problems or effect your self-confidence. Problems getting or keeping an erection can be a sign of a health condition that needs treatment, such as heart disease or poorly controlled diabetes. Especially at younger ages, treating an underlying problem may be enough to reverse erectile dysfunction.

Low Testosterone

Testosterone is the most important sex hormone (otherwise known as androgen) produced in the male body. It is the hormone that is primarily responsible for producing and maintaining the typical adult male attributes.

In adult males, low testosterone may alter certain masculine physical characteristics and impair normal reproductive function. Signs and symptoms may include: erectile dysfunction, infertility, decrease in beard and body hair growth, decrease in muscle mass, development of breast tissue and loss of bone mass (osteoporosis).

Low testosterone can also cause mental and emotional changes. As testosterone decreases, some men may experience symptoms similar to those of menopause in women. These may include: fatigue, decreased sex drive, difficulty concentrating and hot flashes.

Age 40-60 years

40-60 year olds urology needs

Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is when a man has trouble getting or keeping an erection. ED becomes more common as you get older. But male sexual dysfunction is not a natural part of aging.

Some people have trouble speaking with their doctors about sex. However, ED can be a sign of health problems. It may mean your blood vessels are clogged. It could also be caused by nerve damage from diabetes. Getting more exercise, losing weight or stopping smoking may also help.

Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

The prostate is a male reproductive gland that produces the fluid that carries sperm during ejaculation. It surrounds the urethra, the tube through which urine passes out of the body.

An enlarged prostate means the gland has grown bigger. Prostate enlargement happens to almost all men as they get older. As the gland grows, it can press on the urethra and cause urination and bladder problems.

An enlarged prostate is often called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or benign prostatic hypertrophy. It is not cancer, and it does not raise your risk for prostate cancer.

Symptoms of BPH:

  • Not being able to pass urine
  • Having a hard time starting or stopping the urine flow
  • Needing to urinate often, especially at night
  • Weak flow that starts and stops
  • Pain or burning during urination

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is cancer that starts in the prostate gland. The prostate is a small, walnut-sized structure that makes up part of a man’s reproductive system. It wraps around the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of the body. A biopsy is needed to tell if you have prostate cancer. A prostate biopsy is done if you have high PSA level or a rectal exam shows a large prostate or a hard, uneven surface. A sample of tissue is removed from the prostate and sent to a lab.

If prostate cancer is detected, our doctors will review all options available to you – watchful waiting, hormone therapy, radiation therapy or surgical intervention.

Incontinence

Urinary control relies on the finely coordinated activities of the smooth muscle tissue of the urethra and bladder, skeletal muscle, voluntary inhibition, and the autonomic nervous system.  Urinary incontinence can result from anatomic, physiologic, or pathologic (disease) factors. Congenital and acquired disorders of muscle innervation (e.g., ALS, spina bifida, multiple sclerosis) eventually cause inadequate urinary storage or control. Treatments include medications, pelvic floor therapy and surgery.

Bladder Cancer

Cancer is the growth of abnormal cells in the body. These extra cells grow together and form masses, called tumors. In bladder cancer, these growths happen in the bladder. Bladder cancer can usually be successfully treated if it is found and treated early. The treatment depends a lot on how much the cancer has grown.

Most bladder cancers are treated without having to remove the bladder.

Sometimes doctors do have to remove the bladder. For some people, this means having urine flow into a bag outside of the body. But in many cases, doctors can make a new bladder—using other body tissue—that works very much like the old one.

Bladder cancer often comes back. The new tumors can often be treated successfully if they are caught early. So it’s very important to have regular checkups after your treatment is done.

Kidney Stones

Kidney stones (urinary calculi) are stones formed from concentrated levels of minerals typically found in the urine such as calcium and uric acid.  If these minerals concentrate to high enough levels they will crystallize and accumulate into larger stone-like structures known as urinary calculi. They can form anywhere in the urinary tract from the kidneys down to the ureters and bladder.

Patients with stones will often have sudden onset severe flank pain radiating to the groin, nausea, vomiting and tenderness on the flank. A CT scan or X-ray can be done to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment for small stones can include pain medication and increasing fluid intake. If a stone is too large to pass, treatments such as laser therapy, shockwave lithotripsy and ureteroscopy can be performed.

Kidney Cancer

Kidney cancer starts when abnormal cells grow out of control in one or both kidneys. The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs located on either side of the spine, just below the ribs. They filter wastes from the blood and help balance water, salt, and mineral levels in the blood. Another name for kidney cancer is renal cancer. “Renal” means having to do with the kidney.

Kidney cancer doesn’t usually cause symptoms at first. It’s often discovered by imaging tests—tests that produce pictures of the inside of the body—that are done for other reasons.

Whenever possible, doctors use surgery to remove kidney cancer. When the cancer is in its early stages and hasn’t spread, doctors are often able to remove it all, and no further treatment is needed. If surgery isn’t possible, radiation, chemotherapy and immunotherapy and targeted therapy can be utilized.

Interstitial Cystitis

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a painful condition due to inflammation of the tissues of the bladder wall. The cause is unknown.

IC is often misdiagnosed as a urinary tract infection. Patients can go years without a correct diagnosis. On average, there is about a 4-year delay between the time the first symptoms occur and the diagnosis is made.

The condition is most common around ages 30 to 40, although it has been reported in younger people. Women are 10 times more likely to have IC than men.

There is no cure for IC, and there are no standard treatments that are known to be effective for most patients. Results vary from person to person. Treatment is based on trial and error until you find relief.

Age 60-80 years

60-80 years old urology needs

Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

The prostate is a male reproductive gland that produces the fluid that carries sperm during ejaculation. It surrounds the urethra, the tube through which urine passes out of the body.

An enlarged prostate means the gland has grown bigger. Prostate enlargement happens to almost all men as they get older. As the gland grows, it can press on the urethra and cause urination and bladder problems.

An enlarged prostate is often called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or benign prostatic hypertrophy. It is not cancer, and it does not raise your risk for prostate cancer.

Symptoms of BPH:

  • Not being able to pass urine
  • Having a hard time starting or stopping the urine flow
  • Needing to urinate often, especially at night
  • Weak flow that starts and stops
  • Pain or burning during urination

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is cancer that starts in the prostate gland. The prostate is a small, walnut-sized structure that makes up part of a man’s reproductive system. It wraps around the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of the body. A biopsy is needed to tell if you have prostate cancer. A prostate biopsy is done if you have high PSA level or a rectal exam shows a large prostate or a hard, uneven surface. A sample of tissue is removed from the prostate and sent to a lab.

If prostate cancer is detected, our doctors will review all options available to you – watchful waiting, hormone therapy, radiation therapy or surgical intervention.

Incontinence

Urinary control relies on the finely coordinated activities of the smooth muscle tissue of the urethra and bladder, skeletal muscle, voluntary inhibition, and the autonomic nervous system.  Urinary incontinence can result from anatomic, physiologic, or pathologic (disease) factors. Congenital and acquired disorders of muscle innervation (e.g., ALS, spina bifida, multiple sclerosis) eventually cause inadequate urinary storage or control. Treatments include medications, pelvic floor therapy and surgery.

Bladder Cancer

Cancer is the growth of abnormal cells in the body. These extra cells grow together and form masses, called tumors. In bladder cancer, these growths happen in the bladder. Bladder cancer can usually be successfully treated if it is found and treated early. The treatment depends a lot on how much the cancer has grown.

Most bladder cancers are treated without having to remove the bladder.

Sometimes doctors do have to remove the bladder. For some people, this means having urine flow into a bag outside of the body. But in many cases, doctors can make a new bladder—using other body tissue—that works very much like the old one.

Bladder cancer often comes back. The new tumors can often be treated successfully if they are caught early. So it’s very important to have regular checkups after your treatment is done.

Kidney Cancer

Kidney cancer starts when abnormal cells grow out of control in one or both kidneys. The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs located on either side of the spine, just below the ribs. They filter wastes from the blood and help balance water, salt, and mineral levels in the blood. Another name for kidney cancer is renal cancer. “Renal” means having to do with the kidney.

Kidney cancer doesn’t usually cause symptoms at first. It’s often discovered by imaging tests—tests that produce pictures of the inside of the body—that are done for other reasons.

Whenever possible, doctors use surgery to remove kidney cancer. When the cancer is in its early stages and hasn’t spread, doctors are often able to remove it all, and no further treatment is needed. If surgery isn’t possible, radiation, chemotherapy and immunotherapy and targeted therapy can be utilized.


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